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The Empire Club © 2019 | All Rights Reserved

Vladimir Putin

Feinberg, Rabbi Abraham L.

A characteristic of Canadian life: the merger of two forces, by compromise and balance. The contract between the Catholic, French, Latin culture of Quebec, and the Protestant, British, Anglo-Saxon culture which dominates the rest of Canada. A union of convenience; progress in mutual understanding. A second merger in that of provinces and federal government. Third, the partnership of sovereignty, as an independent nation, and sentiment, as a member of the British Commonwealth. The preserved tie with its European parent as the central fact of Canada's existence. Canada initially torn apart by two contradictory loves: geography, and history. An examination of those two loves. The mutual dependence of Britain and Canada dramatized by the visit of Princess, now Queen, Elizabeth and why such a visit would engender such excitement. The British Commonwealth of Nations as a unique example of freedom without separateness, of independence and inter-dependence, of local patriotism and larger co-operation. Canada strengthening the moral status of Britain by joining with her in the quest for peace despite the impasse between the United States and the Soviet Union and by contributing every possible aid to British economic rehabilitation. Why Canada should do this. Canada as a middle power, enabling her to take a positive role in the search for peace. Canada's contribution to the Atomic Age through her natural resources. Such contribution a sacred responsibility for which history has summoned Canada. Canada's affliction of an inferiority complex, and why that is so. The grim prospects for our world. The most valuable gift Canada can bestow on mankind--not her minerals but Canadianism. What Canadianism means. Canada's importance to the United States. Developing a Canadian personality. Canada as a nation of minorities. What a Canadian is and what gives Canada some semblance of unity. Some words by Lorne Pierce in his book "The Canadian People" about Confederation.

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