• White LinkedIn Icon
  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Facebook Icon
  • Flickr - White Circle
  • apple-icon-200x200

The Empire Club © 2019 | All Rights Reserved

Vladimir Putin

Vanderlip, F.A.

The speeches are free of charge but please note that the Empire Club of Canada retains copyright. Neither the speeches themselves nor any part of their content may be used for any purpose other than personal interest or research without the explicit permission of the Empire Club of Canada.

A joint meeting of The Empire Club of Canada and The Canadian Club of Toronto. A very cheerful picture of conditions in the United States. American participation, losses, and benefits with regard to the Great War. What has happened in the year since the close of the war. A review of shipping, labour, factories, taxes, etc. What happened to the U.S. dollar, in some detail. Dealing with the situation in the United States by looking outside of the United States, and how that is so. The seriousness of the blow that has struck Europe. The problems of peace. The disorganization of trade that has led to a paralysis of industry in many countries in Europe. Comparisons with the aftermath of other wars. Why this recovery will be so difficult, looked at in terms of people to support and feed. The German situation in that respect. The situation in England and in a number of European countries, with dollar figures. Italy as one of the danger-points of the world without coal, short of food, unable to move her trains or run her industries, not daring to demobilize her army. Italy on the edge of a possible disaster, and Germany on the edge of a possible revolution, due to a shortage of food. The speaker's belief that it is a great duty of those of us who have a surplus, to loan goods, food, raw materials, those things necessary for other countries to start their industries going. The harsh winter to be faced. The labor situation in the United States, and who is to blame: an examination. What the war has brought to labor: new aspirations for greater manhood, for more voice in the affairs immediately surrounding labor. Some successful illustrations of how improved output and happier conditions must be brought about by better understanding, giving labor a larger voice and clearer comprehension of what the job is all about, and giving employers a more sympathetic understanding of labor's point of view. Fighting the war to have fair play in the world. Simple remedies for a new world. The need for a nation to produce and send out as much as it consumes and brings in. Another look at the financial situation in England. Wakening people to their responsibilities, their obligations and their great opportunities of world-leadership. The need to remodel our definition of foreign trade, and buy and buy and buy from abroad. The United States now as a creditor nation; the need to take goods. Reorganizing our ideas about the tariff. Time to wake up to a comprehension of the seriousness of the European situation and of our own obligations and opportunities.